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Welcome to the world of unicorns.

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Suspense With a Canadian Twist



Today, I’m interviewing Canadian author Joylene Butler whose novel Broken But Not Dead, I had the honour of winning in a draw. Not only was it an amazing novel that held my interest right to the last page, but it earned a bright and shining 5-stars from me. A suspense novelist extraordinaire, I look forward to reading second novel, Dead Witness. Readers, don’t forget to leave a comment for a chance to win one of Joylene’s novels.

Joylene, tell us about your novels.

Not until I began my 5th did I realize all my work has a similar theme, the complexities of the parent/child relationship. In Dead Witness, Valerie is coping with the FBI faking her death and causing her children to believe she’s dead. Having lost her parents when she was 14, she knows the repercussions, and to save her children she’s willing to give the ultimate sacrifice, her life to save theirs.  

In Broken But Not Dead, Metis, English Professor, and single mum Brendell Meshango is coming to terms with the buried rage she feels toward her mother, dead 20 years. When she’s stalked by the deranged son of a powerful white politician, she’s ready to sacrifice her life to save her daughter. 

But what’s even more heroic about these two mothers is they’re not willing to wait for help. They both go after the men threatening their children. And it’s not that they’re particularly brave or warrior-like woman. They’re just ordinary mums who love their children and are ready to protect them with the fierce determination of a cougar protecting her cubs. 
The novel that my publisher has now, Omatiwak, Woman Who Cries, is the story of 60-year-old Sally Warner, who is fighting to stay sane after losing her entire family over the course of two years. A friendship develops between herself and the detective investigating her husband’s murder. It’s through their relationship that they are both forced to come to terms with the demons wreaking havoc on their psyches. While they aren’t related, they do subconsciously assume the parent/child personas.
 I’m looking forward to reading that last one. Now where did you get the ideas for these two novels?

With Valerie McCormick in Dead Witness, my brother, a PI, was visiting from Whitehorse. One day he was on the telephone with his employees, and I was stuck by a thought. If I was pronounced dead, but there was no body, would he have the resources to determine whether it was true. Dead Witness grew from that. 

With Brendell Meshango in Broken But Not Dead, I was nearing 50, feeling the effects of menopause, which means a bit cranky, and one day I thought, “Enough with the blonde bombshells winning the day. Us menopausal, middle-aged women still have a lot of fight left in us!” 

I started visualizing grumpy Brendell, who loved her daughter beyond anything else in her life. The story grew from there. Would Brendell be able to commit the most horrific crime to protect her daughter?

One of the things I really like about you is that you’re a fellow British Columbian. I live in Burnaby, and you live in Prince George, and that automatically puts you in my ‘sisterhood’ file! Not to mention you’re a proud Métis. And for those of you who don’t know what that is, it’s a group of people descended from French/native ancestry.  How did being Métis influence your writing?

I’m grinning because the influence is in everything I write. I’m deeply proud to be Metis and I feel as if it’s my duty to share what that means to my readers. For example, most recently it was discovered that every single person on the earth has the same DNA as Scientific Eve and Scientific Adam from a small village in Africa, who lived some forty thousand years ago. Being Metis doesn’t mean that I can be simply labelled in a particular group. It means I’m cousin to every living being on the planet. I come from the same original parents. In my novels, I hope it is clear that although each of us is unique and special, people are people, no matter what. 

 I totally agree. Now where can we buy your novels?

Thanks for asking, Suzanne.



So what’s in the future for you? What are you working on now?

Right now I’m halfway through my current WIP, book #6, tentatively titled Dead Woman, Broken Man. I’m pushing myself to querying agents for my political thriller KISS OF THE ASSASSIN. I’m also writing a children’s book in my head, called SPIRIT EAGLE, a collaboration I hope to produce with my youngest son, the artist. 

Thanks for dropping by. Readers, don’t forget to leave a comment for a chance to win a copy of Joylene Butler’s novels. 

Thanks so much, Suzanne. This has been a huge honour.


44 comments:

  1. It's been such a honour, Suzanne. Thank you!

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  2. You know I loved Dead Witness, so I'm really eager to read your others. I like the sound of your character in your newest one...and also am going to enjoy Brendell. Thanks for sharing....

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    1. Hi Laurel! Thank you for visiting! Have a great week.

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  3. I loved Brendell too, especially since I'm at that same age. And I too would go through great lengths for my children.

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  4. Joylene, you have a great sense of humor. Blond bombshells don't always win.

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    1. LOL, Thanks, Alex. You aren't blond, are you?

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  5. Sounds like a great read I am intrigued definitely!
    And I have to say from one Suzanne to another I am loving your 'Legacy of a Unicorn' Cover. I have a soft spot for a beautiful unicorn!

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    1. Thanks, Suzanne. Yes, you two definitely share a beautiful name. My niece is another Suzanne.

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  6. I've read Broken But Not Dead, and it was spectacular!

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  7. I love it when it's the ordinary people who tackle the dangerous. This sounds great and the cover is beautiful, so it's already piqued my interest.

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  8. I like the running theme in your novels (and the amazing character development skills this theme requires) of the main character discovering her inner strength and how to use it. And I do hope a publisher will wake up and publish Kiss of the Assassin soon!

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    1. Thanks, Keith. My bestest and oldest (eldest) critique partner!

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  9. No one can stand against a woman when she goes mother bear. I loved Dead Witness and can't wait to read the rest of your books.

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  10. I'll read anything Joylene writes. It's like I'm in the story and can hear my heartbeat. It wouldn't surprise me if Hollywood turned one of her books into a movie, she's that good!

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    1. Oh for goodness sakes, Kittie, what a sweetheart you are! *Hugs!

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  11. It's interesting to hear your comparison of the two stories, Joylene. I thought they were both terrific and am really looking forward to the next. (I already have copies of them, so no need to put my name in the draw, Suzanne.)

    Congratulations to both of you on your successes, from another BC gal! :)

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    1. Thanks, Carol. Hope you're managing okay with all that rain.

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  12. Love this interview! It's always nice to learn about new cultures. I have to admit, I'd looked up "Metis" when I first saw you using it, Joylene--that was years ago. :) Congrats on more novels coming down the pike!!

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    1. That was so sweet of you to look it up, Sandhya. FYI, it's pronounced May-Tee. Go figure.

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    2. I'm so glad you mentioned how to pronounce it, Joylene! I've been trying to figure it out for ages. LOL

      Great interview! :)

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    3. You're welcome, Carrie. I'm used to the strange looks when I write out where I live too. Cluculz pronounced Clue cuz. The 2nd L is silence. Probably because it's shy, ya think? LOL

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  13. Hey Suzanne and um, oh yeah, Joylene,

    An enlightening interview. Joylene is the bestest and I'm real starstruck knowing her. I think that's very kind of you to bring further awareness of Joylene.

    I've lived in Burnaby, New Westminster, Vancouver, Langley and even Surrey, eh!

    Take care, I'm going now, eh.

    Gary :)

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    1. Eh, Gary, it's raining here, eh. Reminds me of you in England, eh, being rained upon, eh.

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    2. What rain instead of snow, eh. Heck, we've had so much rain the magical wee folks in my garden have climbed through my letterbox using a ladder made out of string, eh!

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  14. England, eh? That's a lot of places you've lived in.

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    1. I'm in England to bring further awareness of Canada. The next English person who asks me, "What part of the States you from, mate?", will get a jar of maple syrup placed in a certain location...

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  15. I loved the interview, especially the fact that you have made middle-aged women into great heroines! It's about time someone stood up for us - we may be old, but we still got a lot of spunk and something to say! :-)

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  16. Hi Suzane. Joylene, I Loved Dead Witness. I like a strong, brave woman as the MC. Looking forward to your next stories!! Okay, I'm a Yank and was not familiar with Metis. Interesting info and cool to investigate your cultural heritage. Best wishes.

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  17. I agree with Joylene. People are people regardless of where they're from. :-)

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  18. Great interview! Themes are funny, almost like a reflection. I went through a phase of writing multiple short stories about abused woman and their escape. It didn't hit me what I was doing until maybe the sixth story. (Don't worry, I wasn't abused, but I do know many who are in such relationships, and struggle everyday.) Anyways, now my theme seems to be women fulfilling destined paths. :)

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    1. I think it's great that you're writing what matters to you, Cher. It makes for a deeper, more intense story. Thanks for visiting my interview!

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